Faulty Occupant Classification System Leads to Recall

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#recall #technology #airbags-and-seat-belts
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carcomplaints.com
An overhead view of a parking lot with cars neatly lined up inside parking spaces.

The JX35, Q50, QX60, and G27 are all named in a lawsuit against Infiniti's parent company, Nissan, for an allegedly defective Occupant Classification System (OCS). Plaintiff Matthew Senci filed the proposed class-action lawsuit that alleges the vehicles have occupant classification system software that can incorrectly classify a front passenger seat as empty when it's occupied by an adult passenger. The error can cause the airbag to deactivate and fail to deploy in a crash.

Complaints and warranty claims led to the first OCS recall in March 2013, but it was limited to only 83,000 vehicles. Nissan later admitted, however, that the "fix" for that recall didn't work when they expanded the OCS recalls.

The lawsuit, Matthew Senci v. Nissan North America, Inc., accuses the automaker of being deceptive and selling vehicles with known defects.

More information on carcomplaints.com

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